Category Archives: Teaching Economics

Econ 1, Tiger Woods, and the Crisis@10

Today is the first day of the fall quarter at Stanford, and I begin teaching Economics 1, the introductory economics course, and the course after which this blog is named. The first day is always exciting, especially with many first-year … Continue reading

Posted in Financial Crisis, Monetary Policy, Slow Recovery, Teaching Economics

A Boot Camp with a Good Policy Workout

The annual Hoover Institution Summer Policy Boot Camp is now underway with a great group of college students and recent graduates from around the world.  The one-week program consists of lectures, workshops, and informal discussions, but it’s best described as … Continue reading

Posted in Teaching Economics

Turkey Tantrum Contagion Not Automatic, Rather Policy Dependent

Many have been talking about possible international contagion of the financial crisis in Turkey, and Peter Coy touched on the key issues in yesterday’s Bloomberg piece. Recent economic history and theory offer powerful lessons about contagion. Most important is that … Continue reading

Posted in Financial Crisis, Monetary Policy, Teaching Economics

Still Crazy After All These Years—And What About the Next 50

Yesterday I was talking to a friend in my office about the great benefit to students from writing undergraduate honors theses in their senior year.  I have long advised students to do so, perhaps because of the rewarding experience I … Continue reading

Posted in Monetary Policy, Teaching Economics

Application Deadline Approaching for Free Public Policy Program

After a very successful launch last summer, Stanford’s Hoover Institution is again offering a one-week public policy boot camp this coming August 19-25. This “residential immersion program” is aimed at college students and recent graduates. It consists of lectures, workshops, informal … Continue reading

Posted in Teaching Economics

Happy New Decade!

The Great Recession began exactly one decade ago this month, as later determined by the NBER business cycle dating committee chaired by my colleague, Bob Hall. There is still a great debate about the causes of the Great Recession, its … Continue reading

Posted in Financial Crisis, Slow Recovery, Teaching Economics

What’s Past is Prologue. Study the Past

  Each year the Wall Street Journal asks friends for their favorite books of the year. Two years ago I chose Thomas Sowell’s history of income distribution in Wealth, Poverty, and Politics and Brian Kilmeade’s history on Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli … Continue reading

Posted in Budget & Debt, International Economics, Teaching Economics