Author Archives: John Taylor

The Statistical Analysis of Policy Rules

My teacher, colleague, and good friend Ted Anderson died this week at the age of 98.  Ted was my Ph.D. thesis adviser at Stanford in the early 1970s, and later a colleague when I returned to teach at Stanford in … Continue reading

Posted in Teaching Economics

Central Banks Going Beyond Their Range

Economist John Eatwell of Cambridge and I published a joint letter in the Financial Times today. We argue that monetary policy is off track and that other policies are sorely needed. I said the same in a CNBC interview from Miami … Continue reading

Posted in Monetary Policy

Kocherlakota on the Fed and the Taylor Rule

The use of policy rules to analyze monetary policy has been a growing area of research for several decades, and the pace has picked up recently. Last month Janet Yellen presented a policy framework for the future centered around a … Continue reading

Posted in Monetary Policy

Novel Research on Elections, Policymaking, Economic Uncertainty

The Becker Friedman Institute of the University of Chicago and the Hoover Institution of Stanford University teamed up yesterday to put on a Conference on Elections, Policymaking, and Economic Uncertainty. The conference was held at the Hoover Institution Offices in … Continue reading

Posted in Financial Crisis, Fiscal Policy and Reforms, Regulatory Policy, Stimulus Impact

Think Again and Again About the Natural Rate of Interest

In a recent Wall Street Journal piece, “Think You Know the Natural Rate of Interest? Think Again,” James Mackintosh warns about the high level of uncertainty in recent estimates of the equilibrium interest rate—commonly called r* or the natural rate—that … Continue reading

Posted in Monetary Policy

Jackson Hole XXXV

Everyone keeps asking about this year’s Jackson Hole monetary conference and how it compared with the first. Well, I wrote about the first on my way to this conference, and I have to say the thirty fifth lived up to its billing … Continue reading

Posted in Monetary Policy

A Less Weird Time at Jackson Hole?

I’m on my way to join the world’s central bankers at Jackson Hole for the 35th annual monetary-policy conference in the Grand Teton Mountains. I attended the first monetary-policy conference there in 1982, and I may be the only person … Continue reading

Posted in International Economics, Monetary Policy