Author Archives: John Taylor

Shortest Recession in US History

The Business Cycle Dating Committee of the National Bureau of Economic Research has a very important job. It is responsible for determining the peaks and troughs of business cycles in the United States. It thus decides how long recessions are … Continue reading

Posted in Financial Crisis | Leave a comment

Monetary Policy a Half Century Ago, and Now

Today I  published an article in Project Syndicate. It starts with a memo sent fifty years ago, on June 22, 1971, by Fed Chair Arthur Burns to President Richard Nixon. Inflation was rising and Burns wrote to Nixon that the … Continue reading

Posted in Monetary Policy | Leave a comment

Amazing New Facts About the 2007-2009 Global Financial Crisis

This week Raghu Rajan spoke at the Hoover Economics Policy Working Group on “Going the Extra Mile: Distant Lending and Credit Cycles” a joint paper João Granja and Christian Leuz. Here is a video of his presentation https://www.hoover.org/events/policy-seminar-raghuram-rajan-1 along with … Continue reading

Posted in Monetary Policy, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Impact of the Pandemic and Lasting Lessons for Teaching Economics

Yesterday, I gave a keynote talk at the tenth American Economic Association Conference on Teaching and Research in Economic Education (CTREE). I have been teaching economics for 53 years. I love teaching economics. I love researching economics. And I love … Continue reading

Posted in Financial Crisis, Fiscal Policy and Reforms, Monetary Policy, Regulatory Policy, Stimulus Impact | Leave a comment

A New Look at Income Inequality in the US

Yesterday, at the Hoover Economic Policy Working Group (EPWG), David Splinter of the Staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation discussed a paper he wrote with Gerald Auten of the Office of Tax Analysis at the Department of Treasury. A … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Time for a Reentry to a Monetary Policy Strategy

In a new paper I examine the ways for the Fed to engage in a reentry to a rules-based monetary policy. For several years, starting around 2017, the Fed had begun to move to a rules-based monetary policy that had … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Principles of Economics — Open – Online – Ready To Go

This spring we will be offering an open online version of the Principles of Economics course. To get more information and sign up, go to https://www.edx.org/course/principles-of-economics. The course begins on Monday, March 29, 2021. It is self-paced so students can … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Need for a Monetary Strategy

Today the Federal Open Market Committee described its upcoming plans for the federal funds rate through 2023.  It is good, as I wrote last month on this blog that “Rules Are Back In The Fed’s Monetary Policy Report,” after a … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Rules Are Back In The Fed’s Monetary Policy Report

The Federal Reserve’s latest Monetary Policy Report just released on February 19, 2021 has a whole section on monetary policy rules.  That policy rules are back in the Report is a very welcome development. It re-initiates a helpful reporting approach … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Watch, Listen, and Enjoy a Film About Thomas Sowell

The new one-hour program “Thomas Sowell: Common Sense in a Senseless World,” is a must watch. Beautifully narrated by Jason Riley of the Wall Street Journal, it tells the amazing life story of Thomas Sowell, born in 1930 in North … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment